Yamaha Sled Talk
About Yamaha Motor CanadaAbout the BlogProductsCustomer ServiceTerms of Use

December 30, 2008

Avalanche Tragedy

I was stunned yesterday when I heard the news about a snowmobile tragedy out near Sparwood BC where eight men were killed in two separate  avalanches. In case you had not heard the details, the first avalanche trapped four riders out of the eleven riding in the area. The remaining seven were searching for the victims when a second slide came down on them.

Three guys were able to survive the second slide but were left stranded on the mountain. As of today seven of the missing eight sledders bodies have been recovered.

I followed the story on CBCNEWS.ca as the thought of this tragedy was eating at me. The coverage was as you would expect but the ensuing comments posted on the CBC site were thought provoking and in some cases downright disturbing.

I feel for the friends and families of the victims and offer my deepest sympathies. I also consider those lost trying to save their comrades to be ‘heroes’ not ‘foolish’ as some have posted on the CBC. These guys were experienced riders and well equipped according to the reports I have read. I have to say it repulses me to read comments from those who would turn this horrible event into a ‘ban snowmobiling’ political forum citing us all as irresponsible menace’s and a burden on society.

Helluva way to finish up 2008!

cr

Tags: ,
Related Tags: No related tags found.

Related Posts:
  • None
Posted @ 4:03 pm in Industry News,Travel and Events   

Make a Comment
RSS feed for comments on this post.
TrackBack URI


4 Responses to “Avalanche Tragedy”

  1. Dustin says:

    I read about this as well.

    Those who really know snowmobiling, know the risks, and usually do their best to limit them. Those won’t don’t know, make silly uneducated comments like ‘Ban Snowmobiling!’

    Lets ban walking on the street next! It’s almost humorous to read those things when all of us with common sense know better, but scary knowing there are plenty of ban first, think later mindsets.

  2. parepadarappa says:

    It seems in Canada there are less “Anti-” types at least. Check this link to AOL and see the obnoxious comments here. I honestly wish that this story never would have hit the presses because it just adds more fuel to the fire and gives opportunities for the uninformed to make rude and disrespectful comments on the sport we love so much, and also for cowards to make comments on the deceased. I just hope that I go doing something I love like these people did.

    http://news.aol.com/article/avalanches-bury-snowmobilers-in-canada/288553

  3. Yellowknife says:

    Media makes the world go round – but there’s little honesty to be found throughout it. Perception and pursuasion is all that media is. I work for CBC as a Television News Director and I see this type of thing every day. Most people jump to conclusions without facts and believe the first thing they hear. What’s important is that we, as snowmobilers, can shake off other’s brutal comments with a grain of salt and support each other throughout trying times such as this.

    Well said Allen! Thanks cr

  4. IveyRider says:

    I have not been able to read all of the accounts of the B.C. tragedy. But what I have read comes from people trying to sell the media trade. There is always a “Bad Guy”. Sadly it sells papers. My riding is in the Northwoods of Wisconsin mostly. Last year a WGN anchorman was killed on a snowmobile. You can only imagine the mighty Chicago press and there take on our sport. The exposure that followed was horrific to the North Wisc snowmobile faithful.

    You know, I am thinking a lot of our recession is directly linked to the media and all the doom gloom they have been pedaling. If you watch enough news I think we would all be stocking up on Kraft dinner, shot-gun shells and keeping the tub full of water for drinking as the world collapses around us. (just like my dad did during the cold war nuke scares)!
    cheers cr


Leave a Reply

Comments are moderated and will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive. They may be edited for length and clarity. For more information, please see our Terms of Use.